KEYNOTERS - CTS 2010


Tuesday KeynoteComputing and Autism: An Odyssey Borne of Passion
Gregory D. Abowd
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Wednesday Keynote:  What Are You Feeling?  Technology for Emotion Sensing and Communication
Rosalind W. Picard
MIT Media Laboratory, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

Thursday Keynote:   It's A Matter of Place
Bill Buxton
Microsoft Research, Redmond, Washington, USA

Luncheon Keynote:   Creating a Considerate World
Ted Selker
Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley, California, USA


Tuesday Keynote: Computing and Autism: An Odyssey Borne of Passion
Gregory D. Abowd
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Gregory D. Abowd photo
ABSTRACT
In 1998, as a junior faculty member at Georgia Tech, three things happened that ultimately shaped my future as a computing researcher.  My father died, I started the Aware Home research efforts at Georgia Tech, and my first-born son was diagnosed with autism.  Those three events influenced a rewarding and successful research agenda in technology and autism.  Through a series of projects that have addressed the many stakeholders associated with developmental disabilities, I will show how passion and creativity, together with the technical competence of a variety of collaborators, have shaped a rich research agenda.  There is a reasonable amount of technical detail that spans several computing disciplines, including HCI, computer vision, pattern recognition, and cognitive science.  In this talk, I will focus on how technologies woven into educational and home practices can help teams of caregivers collaborate in serving the best interest of individuals on the autism spectrum.  Specifically, I will present work on decision support tools for teams of therapists, tools for remote analysis of behavioral problems, and services to augment the parent-pediatrician dialogue concerning the developmental progress of children from birth. 


Wednesday Keynote: What Are You Feeling?  Technology for Emotion Sensing and Communication
Rosalind W. Picard
MIT Media Laboratory, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

Rosalind W. Picard photo
ABSTRACT
New technology is making it possible to sense and communicate several aspects of emotion in real time, an important ability for reducing misunderstandings during collaboration.  Many kinds of affective state information - such as whether a person is interested, agreeing, disagreeing, frustrated, confused, or pleased, can now be interpreted by machine through physiological modalities ranging from voice, to facial expression, to autonomic nervous system changes.  This talk will attempt live demonstrations of some of this technology that was developed at the MIT Media Laboratory, and will discuss some of its limitations and capabilities for improving communication in autism, sensory processing disorders, epilepsy, customer experience measurement, human-robot interaction, and therapeutic social interactions.  


Thursday Keynote: It's A Matter of Place
Bill Buxton
Microsoft Research, Redmond, Washington, USA

Bill Buxton photo
ABSTRACT
Inherent in the concept of collaboration is the notion of togetherness - perhaps not in the sense of time or Cartesian space, but together nevertheless.  There must be a common ground established, in some meaningful dimension.  Understanding the essence of that dimension is fundamental to anyone trying to develop a social prosthesis to support collaboration.  The challenge is that the essence is different for different groups, tasks, cultures, etc.  A lack of awareness, much less sensitivity, to this fact lies behind the limited success of one-size-fits-all technologies such as videoconferencing, shared whiteboards, etc.   In 1989 when we coined the term telepresence for this class of system, the definition that we adopted was, "establishing a sense of presence across distance in space and in time."  But the reality is, that definition should be more general to include any dimension which is relevant to establishing a common ground that can serve as the foundation for collaboration.  The importance of this is caught in the words of the great American architect, Louis I. Kahn:

Thoughts exchanged by one and another are not the same in one room as in another.

Collaboration is about co-presence situated in a common place - a place suited for the task at hand.  This talk is intended to create such a place - a common ground where we can begin to develop a better shared understanding of such places, and their place in our work.


Luncheon Keynote:   Creating a Considerate World
Ted Selker
Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley, California, USA

Ted Selker photo
ABSTRACT
No longer will the sensors we develop simply be part of a control system.  We are now poised to create a world where objects with computers in them can recognize our looks, feelings, and actions to simplify how we work with them.  New systems will have to build social awareness into their feedback and attempts to actuate and effect things in the world.  Context aware systems can recognize human intentions, making capabilities available as needed and reducing interruptions and disruption when they aren't.

Collaborations between people and computers, as collaborations between people: systems will be improved with socially appropriate responses.  This talk will present examples in which our intentions can be understood and acted on by computers.  The work reaches across domains to demonstrate that human intentions can be recognized and respected in many complex natural scenarios.  My demonstrations, ranging from beds to email systems, will show how systems can become more socially appropriate as we work to improve our lives without complicating them further.  CarCOACH for example succeeds when working not to bother you when you are negotiating a complex maneuver or have heard the same comment many times.  Disruption Manager as another example automatically mediating communication based on a cognitive model can improve human performance.  With such new tools, people can begin to create a world where systems recognize our needs through our actions to reduce unnecessary complexity in how we work. 


 

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